English Invasion

Hi! I'm an English teacher and this blog is my way to communicate with my students' planet! English is the official language in...

lunedì 2 marzo 2020

Grammar Invasion_Conditionals




Conditional sentences have two parts: the if-clause and the main clause.
Example sentence: If you listen, you will understand the lesson.
If you listen is the if-clause and you will understand the lesson is the main clause.
The IF-clause introduces a condition. The main clause is the result of that condition.
What happens in the main clause is conditional to what happens in the if-clause. In other words the main clause only happens when the events in the if-clause happen.
There are 4 main types of conditional clauses (if-clauses)...

You have to focus on the zero, first and second conditional!
ZERO CONDITIONAL: for facts generally true or do not change

FIRST CONDITIONAL: for possible situation in the future

SECOND CONDITIONAL: 
for hypothetical or unlikely situations. Also used to give advice with If I were you…



Check out the file: 
and this Youtube video to have a full description
Online exercise zero conditional:
Online exercise 1st and 2nd conditional:

giovedì 20 febbraio 2020

Grammar Invasion_Past simple


The past simple or simple past is a verb tense that is used to talk about things that happened or existed before now.


I was in Japan last year.



Check the video to have a full description!!
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1WHhoKQWLvG0t4lk5kgirymoO6QY0fZev/view?usp=sharing


SENTENCE STRUCTURE: 

TIME EXPRESSION USED:






PAST SIMPLE_VERB TO BE:




GENERAL RULE AND SPELLING VARIATIONS:

The General Rule is that you add -ED the base form verb.

Ex: WORK - WORKED

       WALK-WALKED

BUT there are some spelling variations…




ALSO most of common verbs are irregular. Here it is a list of the 50 most common irregular verbs!




EXTRA HOMEWORK!!


https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ltYPQtLIAAqsPD3CB_9zUkb05eGb008l/view?usp=sharing


FUN GAMES!!

spinning wheel
random cards

Example of an English Verbs Wheel:

Try to make it at home, download the example!
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1PQIOwQJXoE6IZYcvH5H5hpt6kAXrmvXe/view?usp=sharing





Over and out!

Grammar Invasion_ The possessive 's



Possessive Case - Genitive Case 
We normally use the ’s with people, animals though it can also be used with places, organizations and companies (which suggest a group of people).
It is not common to use the ’s with non-living things.
1. Singular nouns
add 's (apostrophe S)
  • My mother’s house is next to the beach. (= the house of my mother)
2. Plural nouns ending in –s
only add the apostrophe (without the S)
  • The two sisters’ house is next to mine. (= the house of the two sisters)
3. Plural nouns not ending in –s:
add 's
  • Be careful not to trip over the children’s toys. (= the toys of the children)

Il GENITIVO SASSONE

In italiano per dire che una cosa appartiene a qualcuno usiamo di, ad esempio: 
il libro di mia madre. In inglese, invece, aggiungiamo una s con l'apostrofo al possessore ('s). Questa 's si chiama genitivo sassone. Vediamo come si usa.
Usiamo il genitivo sassone per:
- esprimere possesso
- indicare i rapporti di parentela.
1. Quando il possessore è un nome singolare o un nome plurale irregolare (che non finisce in -s) aggiungiamo 's:
NOMI SINGOLARI E PLURALI IRREGOLARI
+ 's
my mother's book
il libro di mia madre
James's job
il lavoro di James
our children's toys
i giocattoli dei nostri bambini
women's attitude
l'atteggiamento delle donne

2. Quando il possessore è un nome plurale regolare (finisce in -s) aggiungiamo solo l'apostrofo:
NOMI PLURALI REGOLARI
+ '
my parents' car
l'auto dei miei genitori
his friends' house
la casa dei suoi amici

Casi particolari

·       Se un nome è composto da più parole, aggiungiamo il genitivo sassone solo all'ultima:
NOMI COMPOSTI DA PIÙ PAROLE
Peter Jones's daughter
Peter's Jones's...
la figlia di Peter Jones
the Prime Minister's wife
la moglie del Primo Ministro
·       Se i possessori di una cosa sono più di uno, solo l'ultimo prende il genitivo sassone:
PIÙ POSSESSORI DI UNA STESSA COSA
Tom and Mary's children
Tom's and Mary's ...
i figli di Tom e Mary
Mr and Mrs Parker's house
la casa del signore e della signora Parker
 Nel caso di più possessori di cose diverse, ogni possessore prende il genitivo sassone:
PIÙ POSSESSORI DI COSE DIVERSE
Tom's and Mary's children
Tom and Mary's ...
i figli di Tom e quelli di Mary(= Tom e Mary non sono sposati)
my brother's girlfriend's neighbour
il vicino di casa della ragazza di mio fratello
my friend's grandfather's brother's garden
il giardino del fratello del nonno del mio amico



Watch the video to have more details!
In English:

In Italian:

EXTRA HOMEWORK!
COMPILA LE SCHEDE E CONDIVIDILE SUL DRIVE DELLA CLASSE CON IL TUO NOME E COGNOME

ESERCIZIO ONLINE 1:
ESERCIZIO ONLINE 2: 
ESERCIZIO ONLINE 3: 

Over and out!

Grammar Invasion_The verb HAVE GOT

English Version:
You can use have got to talk about …

1. Things we own or possess
We’ve got a house in Vancouver.

2. Family and relationships
I’ve got a new boyfriend.
Have you got any children?

3. People and physical characteristics
Carol’s got brown eyes.

Italian Version: 
HAVE GOT corrisponde in italiano al verbo AVERE.
Si usa per parlare di:
-  possesso
-  relazioni di parentela o amicizia

-  descrizione di persone, animali o cose





LET'S HAVE SOME FUN!




EXTRA HOMEWORK!
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1876zEkUtFUutiFKmY_WQJRrXGQnKPngE/view?usp=sharing

COMPLETA LE SCHEDE E INSERISCILE SUL DRIVE DELLA CLASSE NELLA CARTELLA INGLESE CON NOME E COGNOME

Over and out!

lunedì 20 gennaio 2020

Grammar Invasion_Future forms


Future tenses in English are the toughest tenses to learn. Down below you can find the most important ones and their use.









HAVE A LOOK!!!!!  Powerpoint sui Futuri






Online exercise 1: 
https://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/exercises/tenses/future.htm

Online exercise 2:
https://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/exercises/tenses/future2.htm

EXTRA HOMEWORK!!
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1VaIwrR_SSpGJso8WeLrFH6_jgntp73f5/view?usp=sharing
Completa la scheda ed inseriscila nel drive della classe con nome e cognome.

Over and out.



giovedì 16 gennaio 2020

Grammar invasion_Plural nouns


GENERAL RULE:

Add an -s to the noun.

Ex.
chair - chairs
pen - pens
pencil - pencils

SPELLING VARIATIONS:

  1. if the noun ends in -s, -ss, -x, -o, -ch, -sh, add -ES to make the plural
  2. if the noun ends in consonant + -y, remove the -y and add -ies
  3. if the noun ends in vowel + -y, add -s
  4. if the noun ends in -f, -fe, remove -f or -fe and add -ves

IRREGULAR PLURALS


EXTRA HOMEWORK! CHECK THEM OUT!!


Over and out.

venerdì 10 gennaio 2020

Grammar Invasion_Prepositions of place




A preposition of place is a preposition which is used to refer to a place where something or someone is located. Those are: 






     Let's practice!

     Ex.1
       Ex. 2
TOM'S ROOM GAME

EXTRA HOMEWORK! Check them out!
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Cu-ee_Z5IfflAAerc1V7z4pJB8eiBE0x/view?usp=sharing

Over and out

lunedì 6 gennaio 2020

Grammar Invasion_Relative pronouns and relative sentences


There are two kinds of relative clause:


Let's watch this video about them!!



1.  Defining relative clauses:
We use relative clauses to make clear which person or thing we are talking about:
Marie Curie is the woman who discovered radium.
This is the house which Jack built.
In this kind of relative clause, we can use that instead of who or which:
Marie Curie is the woman that discovered radium.
This is the house that Jack built.
We can leave out the pronoun if it is the object of the relative clause:
This is the house that Jack built(that is the object of built)
Be careful!
The relative pronoun is the subject/object of the relative clause, so we do not repeat the subject/object:
Marie Curie is the woman who she discovered radium.
(who is the subject of discovered, so we don't need she)
This is the house that Jack built it.
(that is the object of built, so we don't need it)
2.  Non-Defining Relative clauses:
We also use relative clauses to give more information about a person, thing or situation:
Lord Thompson, who is 76, has just retired.
We had fish and chips, which I always enjoy.
I met Rebecca in town yesterday, which was a nice surprise.
With this kind of relative clause, we use commas (,) to separate it from the rest of the sentence.
Be careful!
In this kind of relative clause, we cannot use that:
Lord Thompson, who is 76, has just retired.
(NOT Lord Thompson, that is 76, has just retired.)
and we cannot leave out the pronoun:
We had fish and chips, which I always enjoy.
(NOT We had fish and chips, I always enjoy.)

A relative pronoun is used to connect a clause or phrase to a noun or pronoun. 

The most common relative pronouns are who, whom, whose, which, and that. Sometimes when and where can be used as relative pronouns as well.




Over and out.